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The new capitals of the perfume industry

When it comes to the world of masterpieces, we will always think of Paris. However, the new capitals of the perfume industry are emerging, freeing up, and giving the connoisseurs unique and exciting options.

The new capitals of the perfume industry

Paris is no longer in the position of hegemony. Instead, the fragrance industry is tolerating new colors from new perfume capitals around the world. In particular, the three most notable names are California, with the tendency to use ingredients distilled from the native fruits themselves. In Scandinavia, unique and abstract ideas are packaged in jars with inspiration from the interior and architecture of the region. And finally, in Latin America, the aromas of the vast plains of Argentina and the sweet Mexican shores are packed in bottles with striking and colorful designs. Join us in discovering the colors of the industry’s new capitals.

Western United States

The new capitals of the perfume industry

For 170 years, the French fragrance industry has had an enormous influence on the region, laying the foundation for this place to become the perfume capital of the world. In the beginning, in the 1810s, this market was only worth about 2 million French, but by 1889, this market had grown to 75 million. Currently, the Western United States is gathering a lot of niche perfume brands, specializing in perfumes with scents distilled from local fruits. “We buy strawberries from local farmers markets, then dry them and soak them in alcohol as a base for perfumes,” says Linda Sivrican, author of two of the most popular perfumes in the US, Aureum. Botanica and Saguara Perfumes, share. “I also dried lavender from Ojai and lemon from Meyer.” In Oregon and Washington, the trend is perfuming with a floral scent, but there will be a different design with a minimalist design but breaking the color. Fragrances in the Portland region often have a single color design and are directly connected to the color of the material. The perfume logo of Seattle’s Blackbird is reminiscent of the past with impressions of the land itself.
From left to right: Crosby Elements The Golden Door, Ojai Wild, Imaginary Authors Sundrunk, Saguara Perfumes Sagebrush, Riddle Voyeur Roll-on Oil, and Aureum Botanica Ruzha.

Scandinavia

The new capitals of the perfume industry

13 years ago, Byredo was a perfume brand that few people know in Stockholm. But nowadays, the brand’s perfume bottles with cap designs and black graphic font are trendy at essential places around the world such as Glendale, California, and even Hong Kong. “Simply the culmination of complexity is the foremost criterion in the design and manufacture of perfumes by Byredo,” says founder and creative director of the brand, Ben Gorham. “That philosophy has a strong connection with Scandinavian traditional thinking.” Other Swedish perfume brands such as Agonist Parfums, Svensk Parfym, 109 Parfums, and Ann Ringstrand, all have a distinctive design of the area. Besides, other names in this style are Son Venïn of Norway, Andrea Maack of Iceland, Skandinavisk, and Zarkoperfume of Denmark. In general, the fragrance lines of this area are becoming more and more daring. However, the perfume industry is still under the influence of the resonance trend – that is, the smells often blend rather than create a bold “timbre.”
From left to right, Henrik Vibskov Cedar Root Black, Skandinavisk Heia, Agonist Parfums Say Yes, Son Venïn Posthume, Skandinavisk Lysning, Henrik Vibskov Lotus Dust Red, and Byredo Sundazed.

Latin America

The new capitals of the perfume industry

Perfumes have always been a significant business in the region. According to Euromonitor International, a market research and research company, the region spent about $ 10.7 billion in 2015 (meaning more than the US and Canada combined) for the bottles. Currently, the countries in this region not only import perfumes for use but they are also exporting. “In the past, Latin Americans were very fond of European and American perfumes, especially luxury brands,” said Rodrigo Flores-Roux, a senior perfumer who worked for Givaudan. will. “However, there are now more famous brands in the region.” Flores-Roux also listed a few names such as Arquiste Parfumeur – a brand that specializes in the use of essences of regional herbs like lily west, vanilla, guava for the Esencia de El Palacio product line; Xinú – a brand that uses copal resin, a resin that is heavily used in the region’s ancient rituals for the Copála perfume sample; and Frassaï with A Fuego Lento perfume inspired by tango dances. It is also impossible not to mention brands such as Coqui Coqui Perfumeria, whose products are sold at Net-A-Porter and Bergdorf Goodman.